Direct Access

Did you know that you can oftentimes see a physical therapist without a physician’s referral?

Suppose you’ve just injured your shoulder, your knee, or your ankle. It’s been sore for the last week and it is just not healing the way you hoped. What do you do now? While you could make an appointment to see your family doctor, there is another option – direct access.

Direct access is the ability to directly see a physical therapist without seeing a physician first. Because physical therapists are able to evaluate and treat people without a doctor’s referral, a patient is able to save time and money on office visits. Direct access also reduces your overall rehabilitation time because you are able to begin treatment quicker.

However, be sure that you check with your insurance company prior to receiving therapy services. Some insurance companies do not allow direct access, including Medicare and Medical Assistance.

The first step is to contact our office to schedule a FREE 15-minute injury screen. Remember, it’s your right to choose where you receive your therapy services.

35th Annual Injuries in Baseball Course

 

Two of Choice Therapy’s occupational therapists have returned to Bemidji after completing a rigorous three-day course on the prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation of common baseball-related injuries.

Joe and Naomi Kapaun, occupational therapists at Choice Therapy in Bemidji, attended the American Sports Medicine Institute’s (ASMI) Injuries in Baseball course, which covers the latest advancements in treatment and rehabilitation of baseball injuries. Hosted in Dallas, Texas, the course provides instruction for those coaching or treating athletes with baseball-related injuries.

 

“Hearing the latest injury trends will help Naomi and I both in the clinic and when coaching and volunteering with Bemidji Youth Baseball in the summer months,” Joe said. The couple is committed to promoting America’s pastime and keeping Bemidji-area kids safe while they enjoy the sport of baseball.

According to ASMI, their mission is “to improve the understanding, prevention and treatment of sports-related injuries through research and education.” In 2015 alone, the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System reported over 120,000 emergency room visits due to baseball-related injuries. For more information on ASMI, visit http://www.asmi.org/.

“We were able to learn from the top doctors, trainers, and therapists in the nation about the latest treatments and preventions for common baseball injuries,” Naomi said. “We are looking forward to using these new skills to help athletes and others with injuries get back on the road to recovery.”